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White Foods

White foods are great sources of fuel. Some are complete foods that contain all the nutrients, carbohydrates, protein and fat.

White is an arbitrary group which I have made the recepient of a diverse group of highly nutritious foods. In it I have placed grains, grasses and oil together with legumes.

Legumes (beans, peas. soybeans, and lentil are important sources of protein as well as carbohydrate. They share the common trait with oil, grains and grasses as having high calorie energy stores.

Fats and oils should be viewed as colorless foods because they lack phytopigments and only bring calories and fat to the table. That is, with the exception of olive oil, which is treated as a green food.

Garlic and mushrooms are also grouped in the White section, but their importance to health is based on the phytochemicals they contain not their energy stores. These micro-compounds are essential to good health.

 

Yam

 

Yam is the common name for two plant species.

One belongs to the genus Dioscorea.  Dioscoreaceae produce edible tubers.

These yams are native to Africa and Asia.

Dioscoreaceae vary in size and medicinal activity.

Wild Mexican yam is used by many women for its hormonal activity and effects on menopause.

 

Dioscorea tubers, taken as a dietary supplement, are thought to promote human health by improving hormonal and immune-type response.

It is also theorized that extracts of various species of dioscoreace, taken together, fight cancer.

 

 

The other plant known as yam is the sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas).

These yams are not members of the family Dioscoreaceae, which true yams belong.

Instead, sweet potato yams belong to the Morning glory or Convolvulaceae family.

Thanksgiving is a time of sweet potatoes.

Botanicaly, both groups are angiosperms or flowering plants.

Dioscoreacea are monocots, meaning they originate from a single leaf while Convolvulaceae are dicots and develop from two.

 

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Yogurt

Yogurt is one of the great foods of the world. Yogurt is a semi-solid fermented milk product that originated in Turkey and Bulgaria.

Yogurt is made from curdled milk and fermented with a strain of lactobacillus.

Whole milk and skim milk are both used to make yogurt. Yogurt often has fruits, grains and sugars added to it.

Fermentation is the anaerobic breakdown of glucose by yeast or bacteria. Fermentation is the process that converts grape carbohydrates into wine, grains into beer, milk into yogurt, soybeans into miso and green tea into black tea. Fermentation creates a waste product; alcohol in foods and lactic acid in muscle cells.

The bacteria used to initiate the fermentation process of  yogurt are a symbiotic blend of Streptococcus salivarius and Lactobacillus delbrueckii. As the bacteria grow they create a more acidic environment through the production of lactic and acetic acids.

The flavor of yogurt is enhanced by an assortment of aldehydes.

Yogurt promotes intestinal health and helps build strong bones. It is also thought to enhance immunity, lower blood pressure, and may possibly be important in preventing cancer.

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Garlic is king of healing. Although it is a green plant. it deserves mention as king of the white foods as well.

White phytopigments boost immunity, speeds the repair of damaged tissue, and help remove harmful toxins.

 

Detoxification diets, which are often used to restore balance inunhealthy patients, requires a healthy liver. Liver or hepato-health is essential to overall good health. Liver protection is aided by Milk Thistle and Picroliv, two specialized herbs.

Grains include corn, wheat, barley, buckwheat

Soybeans and lentils are especially valuable white foods because they, in addition to their energy and antioxidant content, soy beans are a good source of protein.

White foods have been made scapegoats by the low carbohydrate fanatics who only talk about high glycemic carbohydrates when they demonize carbohydrates. Too much of any one nutrient is probably unhealthy. And so is too little.

Moderation and balance are the keys to good health. A sound diet incorporates complex carbohydrates and essential fats.

White carbohydrates include legumes like soybeans and lentils, whole grains products such as bread, pasta, noodles and rice and the potato tuber (the swollen storage area of the plant’s root). These vilified white carbohydrate have been the staple of every European, Asian, American and North African civilization.

White crops provide essential fuel to sustain life.  Avoid heavily processed grains in favor of whole grain.

Included in the white food groups are dairy and egg products. The American staples of milk, eggs and cheese are important foods that contribute to good health. They are rich in calcium and protein.

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Soy Products

Soy is big part of every vegetarian diet. The bean is eaten raw or fermented into a host of valuable foods

Soy Sauce originated in China over 2,500 years ago, It is a very salty condiment made or rather brewed by fermenting soybeans with the mold Aspergillus in the pressence of roasted grain, water, and salt.

 

Tofu is formed from coagulated soy milk that has been pressed into blocks in a process similar to making cheese from milk.

 

The processing of the soybean makes them more nutritious. This is because the calcium-containing ingredient that coagulates the soy protein into curds, results in a product that is very high in calcium.

There are two types of Tofu: firm and soft.

Chinese tofu is firm and contains more nutrients than Japanese or soft (silken) tofu. Firm tofu contains a bit more more protein, calcium, iron and niacin than the soft variety. It is also higher in fats and carbohydrate and much lower in sodium.

Miso is made from fermented soybeans and grains like barley and rice. These beans and grains have been fermented by the the fungus, aspergillus oryzae.

Miso is usually prepared as a soup and is high in protein and fiber. It is a very good source for zinc, a mineral deficient in many females and athletes.

Zinc deficiency is believed to decrease appetite and may be one of the causes of anorexia nervosa.

Zinc is involved in protein synthesis and collagen formation. Zinc helps regulate blood sugar levels and is thus useful in controlling diabetes.  Miso is also high in sodium.

 

Nato is a sticky, Japanese breakfast food made by fermenting soybeans with the bacteria natto bacillus.

Natto contains a fibrinolytic enzyme, natokinase, which is thought to prevent blood clots and thereby strokes.

In 1999, the FDA authorized the use of health claims concerning the role of soy protein in reducing the risk of coronary heart disease. This was based on the FDA's conclusion that foods containing soy protein and low in saturated fat and cholesterol may reduce the risk of heart disease.

 

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Soy Bean

 

Soybean       Glycine max

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The soybean is a legume, a distinction it shares with lentils, peas, beans and peanuts and was held in such high regard that it was considered one of the five sacred grains along with barley, wheat, millet (hay) and rice by the Chinese.

Fermentation techniques led to the invention of soy sauce, miso, tempeh and natto. Fermented soybeans contain less of the active phytochemicals found in the whole bean.

 

Soybeans are a nutrient-rich food and best plant source of protein.  It also contains unsaturated fat, fiber, B-vitamins, folic acid, potassium, calcium, zinc, and iron. As with all legumes, soy is a great source for iron and does not contain cholesterol.

 

Soybean is the only botanical food that contains all the essential amino acids. Soybeans are lactose free and are therefore used as a substitute for dairy products for lactose intolerant people.

Soybeans contain fructooligosaccharides (FOS). These are the carbohydrates that nourish intestinal bacteria.

 

Soybeans have a low glycemic index, which delays the body’s insulin response. The delayed response stabilizes blood sugar levels with fewer mood swings.

Soybeans contain omega-3 fatty acids and its oil is over 80 percent unsaturated.

Soybeans improve the lipoprotein profile by lowering total triglyceride levels. As a natural wonder drug, soybeans lower the lousy or LDL fraction and raise the healthy or HDL fraction.

 

Soybeans contains the anti-cancer isoflavone, genestein.

Soybeans also contains phytoestrogens, which are believed to reduce the risk and spread of prostate cancer.

Soybeans contain the highest amount of isoflavones among foods. These compounds are considered phytoestrogens and are structurally similar to the more active, human estrogens.

 

The phytoestrogens of soybeans are the isoflavones, genestein, daidzein and glycitein. In their natural state as part of the  soybean, these compounds are always bound to glucose and are termed glycosides. Once injested, they are converted into their active or aglycone (non-glycosidic) form by intestinal bacteria.

 

The isoflavones and phytoestrogens of soybeans are thought to reduce the incidence of breast cancer. This anti-cancer property is associated primarily with the non-fermented soy products, tofu and soymilk, and not with fermented soy products like nato and miso.

 

The isoflavone content of soybeans depends on the method used to isolate it. Soy protein isolates prepared by an ethanol wash process causes the lost of most of their isoflavones, while those prepared by the aqueous wash processes retains them.

 

The isoflavones and phytoestrogens of soy are hormone-like compounds with weak estrogenic and antioxidant activity. These compounds are believed to reduce the incidence of breast and prostate cancer by interfering with their metabolism.

 

On the cellurar level, soybean’s isoflavones act by inhibiting a cancer’s cells enzyme systems and retarding its blood supply.

 

On a molecular level, soybean’s isoflavones inhibit tyrosine kinases and inactivates DNA topoisomerase II. Soybean’s isoflavones are anti-angiogenesis compounds and are thought to arrest cell growth by interfering with signal transduction of one or more of a series of cascading  reactions.

 

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Lentils have been a part of the human diet since pre-history.  It was one of the first crops domesticated and contributes to the healthiness of vegetarian meals. Lentils are especially important in India where half the world’s production takes place and where many people follow vegetarian diets. Known as dal in India, lentils are eaten as often as twice a day.

Lentils have long been part of the Indian diet due to their high protein content. The protein content of lentil (26%) rivals that of soybeans (40%) for top honors regarding plant sources of protein.

Lentils (Lens culinaris) are shaped like disks and are named based on the Latin word for lens. Lentils are sold in many forms, colors and sizes. They are found with and without skins, whole or split.

 

The color of lentils range from yellow to red-orange and from green to black.

Red, white and yellow lentils have had their skins removed, while yellow lentils or Chana, is made from the kernels of chickpeas.

 

Lentils are boiled with vegetables, seasoned with spices and served over rice.


 

Common varieties from wiki

  • Toor dal, i.e. yellow pigeon peas, is available either plain or oily. It is the main ingredient for the South Indian recipe called sambar. In Karnataka it is calledTogare bele.
  • Chana dal is produced by removing the outer layer of kala chana (black chickpeas) and then splitting the kernel. Although machines can do this, it can also be done at home by soaking the whole chickpeas and removing the skins by rubbing.
  • Yellow split peas, while not commonly used on the Indian sub-continent, are very prevalent in the Indian communities of Guyana and Trinidad, and were formerly popular amongst Indians in the United States. There, it is referred to generically as dal and is the most popular dal, although masoor dal and toor dal are also used. It is prepared similarly to dals found in India, but also may be used in a variety of other recipes.
  • Kala chana are small chickpeas with brown skins. In the US and Canada, it is known as Desi chickpea and the variety most used is called 'Myles'. It is very disease resistant.
  • Kabuli dal, known for its black coat, is an average-sized chickpea. It grows naturally with the black coat, and it is said to be nuttier in flavor.
  • Mussyang is from dals of various colors found in various hilly regions of Nepal.

 

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Legumes

The Fabaceae or Leguminosae family are flowering plants.  

 Fabaceae have always been important to human civilization.  The nutritive value they provide and the invaluable phytonutrients they contain prevent disease.

They also host important bacteria in their roots.

These bacteria or rhizobia, remove nitrogen gas (N2) from the air and convert it into NO3 or NH3 in a process known as nitrogen fixation.

In this symbiotic relationship nitrogen becomes usable by the plant and can replenish soil that has been depleted of its nitrogen.

 

Although not often thought of as fruit, legumes, peas, and beans are in fact fruits.

Legumes are the dry fruits that develop from the reproductive organ of plants, the ovary. 

Legumes have been a staple for over 8000 years and are essential for individuals who don’t consume enough protein in their meals.

The Paleo diet bans legumes and grains from its meals. For certain people, this may be a good idea since lectins contained in these foods can cause digestive issues.

Legumes are among the healtiest foods on the planet.

They provide all the neccessary nutrients to sustain life.

Legumes are entities that can be separated into valves when opened along its seam.

Legumes are pods.  The term pulses is also used to describe these plants as well as the grains and seeds they contain.

Pulses are leguminous plants that contain grains or seeds, which vary in color, size, and shape within a pod.

Pulses are important food crops due to their high amino acid content (25% by weight).

Example of pulses include kidney beans (Phaseolus vulgaris), Black-eyed peas (Vigna unguiculata) chickpeas (Cicer arietinum) and lentils (Lens culinaris).

 

Other legumes include soybeans and peanuts, which in addition to their nutritive value, they are pressed to extract their oil.

 

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Garlic

Allium is the genus of plants whose role in health is indisputable.

Allium represents the family of onions.

There are more than a thousand species of allium, which makes it one of the largest genera of plants in the world.

Garlic is medicinally, the most important of the allium species.

Other members include onions, shallots, leeks and chives. Strong odors are characteristic of all allium species.

Allium sativum or garlic, is a spice that adds a characteristic pungent, spicy flavor to food.

Garlic also provides aromas that stimulate the appetite receptors in the brain that promotes eating.

The library of phytocompounds embedded in the fibers of garlic bind with a set of receptors in the brain causing them to become sensitive to the molecule leptin, the neuropeptide that turns off eating.

Garlic is therefore an appetite regulator as well as a stimulator.

Whole garlic provides a natural built in balance that is lacking in fast-food.

In fact, comfort foods promote overeating by the absence of these balancing phytocompounds.

In comfort foods, these vital molecules are replaced with the addictive compounds added by food manufacturers.

The ancestor of modern garlic arose in Central Asia.  

Cultivated for over 5000 years, garlic is one of Nature’s most perfect foods.

Its underground bulb contains fleshy cloves. Cloves contain the library of  compounds mentioned above.

The activity of garlic is due to its acrid or bitter compounds.

Garlic is used extensively in food for its flavor and ability to stimulate appetite.

Garlic is one of the fundamental foods of preventive medicine.

Garlic can be found in many forms.

It can be raw, sautéed in oil, steam distilled, or freeze-dried)

Garlic's libraries of phytonutrients are chemical agents in the body.

Some act directly while others must be converted into an active form in the body.

Garlic yields a different library of compounds depending on the way it is prepared.  

The active agents are all sulfur containing compounds.

Sulfur’s presence lends aromaticity and gives garlic its odoriferous nature.  Additionally, garlic owes many of its beneficial health effect to the incorporation of sulfur into the molecule allicin, the active ingredient of garlic.

Garlic contains the volatile oil, alliin.

When the plant’s tissues are crushed, the volatile alliin is exposed to the garlic enzyme, allinase.

Allinase converts inactive alliin to allicin, which is converted to the odoriferous and antibacterial compound, diallyl disulphide.

Other constituents of garlic include the recently discovered mineral germanium, thought to reduce the risk of cancer.

Germanium is part of an oxygenating therapy for cancer that employs the injection of germanium sesquioxide.  

Studies in Japan indicate that germanium inhibits the cancer process by enhancing natural killer cell activity and increases the availability of oxygen to all cells.  

Cancer cells do not thrive under oxygen-rich environment.

Garlic’s sulfur compounds are protectively enhanced from oxidation by the presence of of the mineral, selenium.

Some of the lesser-known phytochemicals of garlic also produce beneficial effects. These effects depend on the presence of ajoene (a secondary degradation product of alliin).

Ajoene is believed to inhibit platelet aggregation.

It has been proposed that ajoene exerts its effect by altering the platelet membrane via an interaction with sulfhydryl groups

Ajoene is a potent inhibitor of prostaglandin synthase and lipoxygenase activity, the enzymes responsible for the inflammatory response to tissue injury.

Effects of Garlic

Garlic has been used since the dawn of history to ward off evil spirits and pathogenic organisms.

While its effect of vampires is debatable, its prevention of microbial growth is not. Garlic and its sulfur content are plant based antibiotics.

In addition, garlic is known to purify and disinfect the lungs as the volatile oil alliin passes through the alveoli and the bronchial tree.

World travelers are often advised to place garlic in various body parts to ward off infections.

Healers advocate garlic cloves to enhance the body’s immunological activity and heighten its resistance to disease.

Crushed by the process of mastication and the release of allicin in the mouth, garlic suppresses dental and throat infections.

Cardiovascular

Garlic has also been shown to lower blood cholesterol levels after meals in which it is consumed.  Research indicates that the LDL fraction of serum lipoproteins, the lousy cholesterol, is reduced with half a clove of garlic a day.

Garlic also increase the formation of high-density lipoproteins, the healthy form of cholesterol that facilitates removal from arterial tissue.

Garlic is known to reduce the tendency towards forming blood clots (thrombi) by inhibiting platelet aggregation as well as by reducing the level of fibrinogen, a clotting precursor.

Anti-inflammatory Effects

Garlic has strong anti-inflammatory activity and reduces prostaglandin, leukotriene and thromboxane formation.

In addition, garlic’s vasodilation properties cause a reduction in blood pressure and may prevent the formation of blood clots.

Anti-cancer

Garlic extracts have demonstrated the ability to suppress the formation of nitrosamines from dietary nitrites.  

Nitrites are preservatives used in processed meat.  

Nitrosamines are carcinogenic compounds, which initiate changes in cell DNA.

These mutations as they are known are believed to account for the aggressive growth of cancer cells.  

Garlic is believed to interfere in every phase of the cancer process.

The allylsulfides increase the ‘phase 2’ liver detoxification enzyme (glutathione transferase) that increases the solubility of cancer metabolizes and expedites their excretion from the body.

Digestive

Garlic’s effects on the digestive system involve a stimulation of gut secretions and activities.  

Garlic promotes the colonization of healthy intestinal flora while its anti-pathogenic activity discourages undesirable settlement.

 Garlic enhances peristaltic activity and restores gut motility.

The glucokinins present in garlic are believed to improve pancreatic performance by increasing the production of insulin and glucagon.  

As such, garlic is often included in the diet of diabetics and hypoglycemics.

The importance of garlic to health is well documented and highly recommended.

The importance of limiting and minimizing injury, the increased resistance to infection, the improved assimilation of nutrients and their delivery through improved circulatory dynamics are among the chief reasons why athletic performance would be enhanced by garlic.

History

Garlic has been used over the millennia.

In Chinese medicine, garlic was an all purpose herb. 

The underground compound or bulb is made up of cloves. This part of the plant contains the library of active compounds.

Garlic is employed therapeutically for its acrid or bitter properties and used extensively in food for its flavor and stimulation of appetite.

Chemistry

Garlic yields different active ingredients depending on the way it is prepared.  Garlic (raw, sautéed in oil, steam distilled, or freeze-dried) contains different chemical agents. The active agents are all sulfur containing compounds. Sulfur’s presence lends aromaticity and gives galic its odoriferous nature.  Additionally, garlic owes many of its beneficial health effect to the incorporation of sulfur into the molecule allicin, the active ingredient of garlic.

Garlic contains volatile oils (alliin). When the plant’s tissues are crushed, the volatile alliin is exposed to the garlic enzyme, allinase. Allinase converts inactive alliin to allicin, which is converted to the odoriferous and antibacterial compound, diallyl disulphide.

Other constituents of garlic include the recently discovered mineral germanium, thought to reduce the risk of cancer. Germanium is part of an oxygenating therapy for cancer that employs the injection of germanium sesquioxide.  Studies in Japan indicate that germanium inhibits the cancer process by enhancing natural killer cell activity and increases the availability of oxygen to all cells.  Cancer cells do not thrive under oxygen-rich environment. Garlic’s sulfur compounds are protectively enhanced from oxidation by the presence of selenium.

Pharmacology

Some of the lesser-known phytochemicals of garlic also produce beneficial effects. These effects depend on the presence of ajoene (a secondary degradation product of alliin).

Ajoene is believed to inhibit platelet aggregation. It has been proposed that ajoene exerts its effect by altering the platelet membrane via an interaction with sulphydryl groups

Ajoene is a potent inhibitor of prostaglandin synthase and lipoxygenase activity, the enzymes responsible for the inflammatory response to tissue injury.

Antiseptic effects of Garlic

Garlic has been employed throughout history to ward off evil spirits and pathogenic organisms. Garlic has also been recognized for its ability to control microbial growth through its broad-spectrum, antibiotic activity.

In addition, garlic is known to purify and disinfect the lungs as the volatile oil alliin passes through the alveoli and the bronchial tree.  World travelers are often advised to place garlic in various body parts to ward off infections. Other healers advocate garlic cloves to enhance the body’s immunological activity and heighten its resistance to disease. Crushed by the process of mastication in the mouth, garlic suppresses dental and throat infections.

Cardiovascular effects

Garlic has also been shown to lower blood cholesterol levels after meals in which it is consumed.  Research indicates that the LDL fraction of serum lipoproteins is reduced with consumption of half a clove of garlic a day.  Garlic is known to increase the production of high-density lipoproteins, the favorable form of lipoproteins that promotes the removal of cholesterol from arterial tissue.

Garlic is known to reduce the tendency towards forming blood clots (thombi) by inhibiting platelet aggregation as well as by reducing the level of fibrinogen, a clotting precursor.

Anti-inflammatory Effects

Garlic has strong anti-inflammatory activity and reduces prostaglandin, leukotriene and thromboxane formation. In addition, garlic’s vasodilation properties cause a reduction in blood pressure and may prevent the formation of blood clots.

Anti-cancer effects

Garlic extracts have demonstrated the ability to suppress the formation of nitrosamines from dietary nitrites.  Nitrites are preservatives used in processed meat.  Nitrosamines are carcinogenic compounds, which initiate changes in cell DNA.

These mutations as they are known are believed to account for the aggressive growth of cancer cells.  Garlic is believed to interfere in every phase of the cancer process.

The allylsulfides increase the ‘phase 2’ liver detoxification enzyme (glutathione transferase) that increases the solubility of cancer metabolizes and expedites their excretion from the body.

Digestive effects

Garlic’s effects on the digestive system involve a stimulation of gut secretions and activities.  Garlic promotes the colonization of healthy intestinal flora while its anti-pathogenic activity discourages undesirable settlement.  Garlic enhances peristaltic activity and restores gut motility.

The glucokinins present in garlic are believed to improve pancreatic performance by increasing the production of insulin and glucagon.  As such, garlic is often included in the diet of diabetics and hypoglycemics.

Athletic Application

The importance of garlic to health is well documented and is recommended for everyone.

The importance of limiting and minimizing injury, the increased resistance to infection, the improved assimilation of nutrients and their delivery through improved circulatory dynamics are among the chief reasons  why athletic performance would be enhanced by garlic.

Allium is the genus of plants whose role in health is indisputable. Allium represents the family of onions. There are more than a thousand species of allium, which makes it one of the largest genera of plants in the world.

Garlic is medicinally the most important of the allium species. Other members include onions, shallots, leeks and chives. Strong odors are characteristic of all allium species.

Allium sativum or garlic, is a spice that adds a characteristic pungent, spicy flavor to food. It also provides aromas that stimulate the appetite receptors in the brain to promote eating. It’s phytocompounds bind with receptorss causing them to become sensitive to leptin, the neuropeptide that turns off eating.

Garlic is therefore an appetite regulator as well as a stimulators. A natural built in balance that is lacking in fast-food. In fact, comfort foods promote overeating by the absence of these balancing phytocompound, replaced with the addictive compounds added by food manufacturers.

The ancestor of modern garlic arose in Central Asia.  Cultivated for over 5000 years, garlic is Nature’s most perfect foods. Its underground bulb contains fleshy cloves. Cloves contain a library of  compounds.  Activity due to its acrid or bitter compounds. Garlic is used extensively in food for its flavor and ability to stimulate appetite. Garlic is one of the fundamental foods of preventive medicine.

Garlic (raw, sautéed in oil, steam distilled, or freeze-dried) contains libraries of phytonutrients. Some act as chemical agents directly while others must be converted into active ones by the body.

Garlic yields a different library of compounds depending on the way it is prepared.   The active agents are all sulfur containing compounds. Sulfur’s presence lends aromaticity and gives garlic its odoriferous nature.  Additionally, garlic owes many of its beneficial health effect to the incorporation of sulfur into the molecule allicin, the active ingredient of garlic.

Garlic contains volatile oils (alliin). When the plant’s tissues are crushed, the volatile alliin is exposed to the garlic enzyme, allinase. Allinase converts inactive alliin to allicin, which is converted to the odoriferous and antibacterial compound, diallyl disulphide.

Other constituents of garlic include the recently discovered mineral germanium, thought to reduce the risk of cancer. Germanium is part of an oxygenating therapy for cancer that employs the injection of germanium sesquioxide.  Studies in Japan indicate that germanium inhibits the cancer process by enhancing natural killer cell activity and increases the availability of oxygen to all cells.  Cancer cells do not thrive under oxygen-rich environment. Garlic’s sulfur compounds are protectively enhanced from oxidation by the presence of selenium.

Some of the lesser-known phytochemicals of garlic also produce beneficial effects. These effects depend on the presence of ajoene (a secondary degradation product of alliin).

Ajoene is believed to inhibit platelet aggregation. It has been proposed that ajoene exerts its effect by altering the platelet membrane via an interaction with sulfhydryl groups

Ajoene is a potent inhibitor of prostaglandin synthase and lipoxygenase activity, the enzymes responsible for the inflammatory response to tissue injury.

Effects of Garlic

Garlic has been used since the dawn of history to ward off evil spirits and pathogenic organisms. While its effect of vampires is debatable, its prevention of microbial growth is not. Garlic and its sulfur content are plant based antibiotics.

In addition, garlic is known to purify and disinfect the lungs as the volatile oil alliin passes through the alveoli and the bronchial tree.

World travelers are often advised to place garlic in various body parts to ward off infections.

Healers advocate garlic cloves to enhance the body’s immunological activity and heighten its resistance to disease. Crushed by the process of mastication in the mouth, garlic suppresses dental and throat infections.

Cardiovascular

Garlic has also been shown to lower blood cholesterol levels after meals in which it is consumed.  Research indicates that the LDL fraction of serum lipoproteins, the lousy cholesterol, is reduced with half a clove of garlic a day.

Garlic also increase the formation of high-density lipoproteins, the healthy form of cholesterol that facilitates removal from arterial tissue.

Garlic is known to reduce the tendency towards forming blood clots (thrombi) by inhibiting platelet aggregation as well as by reducing the level of fibrinogen, a clotting precursor.

Anti-inflammatory Effects

Garlic has strong anti-inflammatory activity and reduces prostaglandin, leukotriene and thromboxane formation. In addition, garlic’s vasodilation properties cause a reduction in blood pressure and may prevent the formation of blood clots.

Anti-cancer

Garlic extracts have demonstrated the ability to suppress the formation of nitrosamines from dietary nitrites.  Nitrites are preservatives used in processed meat.  Nitrosamines are carcinogenic compounds, which initiate changes in cell DNA.

These mutations as they are known are believed to account for the aggressive growth of cancer cells.  Garlic is believed to interfere in every phase of the cancer process.

The allylsulfides increase the ‘phase 2’ liver detoxification enzyme (glutathione transferase) that increases the solubility of cancer metabolizes and expedites their excretion from the body.

Digestive

Garlic’s effects on the digestive system involve a stimulation of gut secretions and activities.  Garlic promotes the colonization of healthy intestinal flora while its anti-pathogenic activity discourages undesirable settlement.  Garlic enhances peristaltic activity and restores gut motility.

The glucokinins present in garlic are believed to improve pancreatic performance by increasing the production of insulin and glucagon.  As such, garlic is often included in the diet of diabetics and hypoglycemics.

The importance of garlic to health is well documented and is therefore highly recommended.

The importance of limiting and minimizing injury, the increased resistance to infection, the improved assimilation of nutrients and their delivery through improved circulatory dynamics are among the chief reasons why athletic performance would be enhanced by garlic.

Read more...

Eggs & Dairy

 

Eggs

Eggs are a good source of protein but are very often treated as a forbidden food because of their high cholesterol content. Reduced intake of cholesterol is a mantra of healthy heart advocates who believe dietary cholesterol is the most important factor in developing high blood levels of cholesterol.

An alternative view holds that, saturated fat in the diet, not dietary cholesterol, is what affects blood cholesterol levels. They argue that for healthy people, saturated fat is a greater concern than dietary cholesterol.

Eggs can be eaten in moderation and be incorporated into a sound nutritious program. Eggs are now fortified with omega-3 fatty acids to improve cardiovascular health.

Milk

Milk protein is composed of twenty percent whey protein and eighty percent casein protein. Whey supplements remove the fat and lactose from milk and add some metabolic intermediaries. Whey is considered to have high Biological Value, which measures the quality of a protein.

Whey powders line the shelves of health food stores. There are over a hundred designer protein supplements on the market, each one only slightly different from the other. Their purpose is to help athletes build extra muscle.

Protein supplements are not recommended since most athletes obtain enough protein from their diet and don’t benefit from this artificial stimulation.

Cheese

Cheese making is the process of removing water, lactose and minerals from milk. Its purpose is to produce a concentrate of milk fat and protein. The essential ingredients of cheese are milk, rennet, a coagulating enzyme and bacteria. Rennet causes the milk proteins to aggregate transforming milk into a semi soft gel. When the gel is cut into small pieces (curds), the whey begins to separate from the curd.

Acid production by bacteria furthers the separation of the whey from the curd, which determines the moisture, flavor and texture of the cheese.

There are seven cheese families based on the type of coagulation, the amount of time to cure and ripen, and the type of texture (hard or soft) of the cheese. Cottage, mozzarella, ricotta, feta, Gouda, cheddar and Parmesan are examples of each of the different families. The milk of cows, goats and sheep are all used.

Yogurt

Yogurt is one of the great foods in the world. Yogurt is a semi-solid fermented milk product that originated in Turkey and Bulgaria.

Yogurt is made from curdled milk and fermented with a strain of lactobacillus.

Whole milk and skim milk are both used to make yogurt. Yogurt often has fruits, grains and sugars added to it.

 

Fermentation is the anaerobic breakdown of glucose by yeast or bacteria. Fermentation is the process that converts grape carbohydrates into wine, grains into beer, milk into yogurt, soybeans into miso and green tea into black tea.

 

Fermentation creates a waste product; alcohol in foods and lactic acid in muscle cells.

 

The bacteria used to initiate the fermentation process of  yogurt are a symbiotic blend of Streptococcus salivarius and Lactobacillus delbrueckii.

 

As the bacteria grow they create a more acidic environment through the production of lactic and acetic acids.

 

The flavor of yogurt is enhanced by an assortment of aldehydes.

 

Yogurt promotes intestinal health and helps build strong bones. It is also thought to enhance immunity, lower blood pressure, and may possibly be important in preventing cancer.

 

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Grains

 

White carbohydrates include legumes like soybeans and lentils, grains products like bread, pasta, noodles and rice, as well as the potato tuber (the swollen storage area of the plant’s root). These vilified white carbohydrate have been the staple of every European, Asian, American and North African civilization.

White foods have been made scapegoats by the low-carbohydrate fanatics who talk about high glycemic carbohydrates when they want to demonize carbohydrates.

Too much of any one nutrient is probably unhealthy. And so is too little.

Moderation and balance are the keys to good health.

Any sound diet must emphasize complex carbohydrates and include essential fats. Any diet that bans those nutrients should come with a Black Box warning.

White fuel includes grains, beans and lentils. Soybeans and lentils are especially valuable because they, in addition to their energy and antioxidant content, are a good source of protein.

Grains include corn, wheat, barley, rye and buckwheat.

White crops provide essential fuel to sustain life.  Avoid heavily processed grains in favor of whole grain.

Included in the white food groups are dairy and egg products. The American staples of milk, eggs and cheese are important foods that contribute to good health. They are rich in calcium and protein.

Grains

Whole grains have been a major part of all three meals since three meals a day became the norm. Whole grains and grasses are high in complex carbohydrates, high in fiber and provide a unique library of phytonutrients needed by the body. Wheat, barley, corn, buckwheat and all the other grains are made up of a bran, endosperm and germ.

The bran is the fiber-rich outer layer of the grain. It is also rich in B vitamins and minerals. The endosperm is the middle layer and is rich in protein and carbohydrate. The germ is the most nutrient dense region.

Wheat germ, which is the embryo of the wheat berry, is an unpolished and unheated treasure trove of nutrients. High in B-vitamins, minerals, omega-3 fats and phytosterols, wheat germ is one of Nature’s most healthy food.

Whole grains in general lower the risk of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, obesity and cancer.

It is the refining of these grains that causes the problems for the consumers of these foods. Removed of its natural library, refined carbohydrates and high glycemic sugars are a danger to health. 

The refining process strips the grain of its nutrients leaving calorie-dense flour and white rice in its place. Gone are the fibers, vitamins and phytonutrients bound up in the grain.

 

 

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